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... 3D-printed cast could speed up healing while making you look cool ... The Osteoid Medical cast designed by Deniz Karasahin can be hooked up to an ultrasound machine that promises to reduce the time it takes for a broken bone to mend. The cast is also lighter, better for the environment and more comfortable than bulky plaster ones.

... 3D-printed cast could speed up healing while making you look cool ... The Osteoid Medical cast designed by Deniz Karasahin can be hooked up to an ultrasound machine that promises to reduce the time it takes for a broken bone to mend. The cast is also lighter, better for the environment and more comfortable than bulky plaster ones.

... 3D-printed cast could speed up healing while making you look cool ... The Osteoid Medical cast designed by Deniz Karasahin can be hooked up to an ultrasound machine that promises to reduce the time it takes for a broken bone to mend. The cast is also lighter, better for the environment and more comfortable than bulky plaster ones.

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... Are humans Earth’s biggest enemy? ... The Earth was once populated with enormous beasts, the likes of which we have never seen – from mammoths to giant beavers, and sabretooths to horned tortoises. Over the last two million years many of these giant beasts, known as megafauna, have either been wiped out completely, or replaced by smaller counterparts living side-by-side with an ever increasing human population. The debate on exactly what caused this mass extinction has been raging for years – on one side of the fence, the demise is being blamed on natural climate change, on the other, humans and our carnivorous ways have ‘destroyed’ the world. Earlier this week, St John’s College in Oxford played host to the annual Megafauna conference. The meeting is a chance for experts, zoologists, archaeologists and scientists to debate the demise of these mega beasts and how their disappearance has impacted on how we live today. British environmentalist and writer George Monbiot is outspoken in his belief that humans are to blame for the mass extinction, a theory known as ‘overkill hypothesis.’ He believes there is a direct correlation between humans arriving and populating continents across the globe and the widely-seen demise of many megafauna species. ‘Before Homo erectus, perhaps our first recognisably-human ancestor, emerged in Africa, the continent abounded with monsters. 'There were several species of elephants. There were sabretooths and false sabretooths, and giant hyenas,’ said Monbiot.

... Are humans Earth’s biggest enemy? ... The Earth was once populated with enormous beasts, the likes of which we have never seen – from mammoths to giant beavers, and sabretooths to horned tortoises. Over the last two million years many of these giant beasts, known as megafauna, have either been wiped out completely, or replaced by smaller counterparts living side-by-side with an ever increasing human population. The debate on exactly what caused this mass extinction has been raging for years – on one side of the fence, the demise is being blamed on natural climate change, on the other, humans and our carnivorous ways have ‘destroyed’ the world. Earlier this week, St John’s College in Oxford played host to the annual Megafauna conference. The meeting is a chance for experts, zoologists, archaeologists and scientists to debate the demise of these mega beasts and how their disappearance has impacted on how we live today. British environmentalist and writer George Monbiot is outspoken in his belief that humans are to blame for the mass extinction, a theory known as ‘overkill hypothesis.’ He believes there is a direct correlation between humans arriving and populating continents across the globe and the widely-seen demise of many megafauna species. ‘Before Homo erectus, perhaps our first recognisably-human ancestor, emerged in Africa, the continent abounded with monsters. 'There were several species of elephants. There were sabretooths and false sabretooths, and giant hyenas,’ said Monbiot.

... Are humans Earth’s biggest enemy? ... The Earth was once populated with enormous beasts, the likes of which we have never seen – from mammoths to giant beavers, and sabretooths to horned tortoises. Over the last two million years many of these giant beasts, known as megafauna, have either been wiped out completely, or replaced by smaller counterparts living side-by-side with an ever increasing human population. The debate on exactly what caused this mass extinction has been raging for years – on one side of the fence, the demise is being blamed on natural climate change, on the other, humans and our carnivorous ways have ‘destroyed’ the world. Earlier this week, St John’s College in Oxford played host to the annual Megafauna conference. The meeting is a chance for experts, zoologists, archaeologists and scientists to debate the demise of these mega beasts and how their disappearance has impacted on how we live today. British environmentalist and writer George Monbiot is outspoken in his belief that humans are to blame for the mass extinction, a theory known as ‘overkill hypothesis.’ He believes there is a direct correlation between humans arriving and populating continents across the globe and the widely-seen demise of many megafauna species. ‘Before Homo erectus, perhaps our first recognisably-human ancestor, emerged in Africa, the continent abounded with monsters. 'There were several species of elephants. There were sabretooths and false sabretooths, and giant hyenas,’ said Monbiot.

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Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

Huge Rock Crashes Into Moon, Sparks Giant Explosion NASA astronomers have been monitoring the moon for lunar meteor impacts for the past eight years, and haven't seen anything this powerful before. The moon has a new hole on its surface thanks to a boulder that slammed into it in March, creating the biggest explosion scientists have seen on the moon since they started monitoring it. The meteorite crashed on March 17, slamming into the lunar surface at a mind-boggling 56,000 mph (90,000 kph) and creating a new crater 65 feet wide (20 meters). The crash sparked a bright flash of light that would have been visible to anyone looking at the moon at the time with the naked eye, NASA scientists say. "On March 17, 2013, an object about the size of a small boulder hit the lunar surface in Mare Imbrium," Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office said in a statement. "It exploded in a flash nearly 10 times as bright as anything we've ever seen before."

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Canon develops 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor for very low light video capture TOKYO, March 4, 2013—Canon Inc. announced today that the company has successfully developed a high-sensitivity 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor exclusively for video recording. The new Canon 35 mm CMOS sensor*1 enables the capture of Full HD video even in exceptionally low-light environments. Delivering high-sensitivity, low-noise imaging performance. Read More -- http://www.canon.com/news/2013/mar04e.html

Canon develops 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor for very low light video capture TOKYO, March 4, 2013—Canon Inc. announced today that the company has successfully developed a high-sensitivity 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor exclusively for video recording. The new Canon 35 mm CMOS sensor*1 enables the capture of Full HD video even in exceptionally low-light environments. Delivering high-sensitivity, low-noise imaging performance. Read More -- http://www.canon.com/news/2013/mar04e.html

Canon develops 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor for very low light video capture TOKYO, March 4, 2013—Canon Inc. announced today that the company has successfully developed a high-sensitivity 35 mm full-frame CMOS sensor exclusively for video recording. The new Canon 35 mm CMOS sensor*1 enables the capture of Full HD video even in exceptionally low-light environments. Delivering high-sensitivity, low-noise imaging performance. Read More -- http://www.canon.com/news/2013/mar04e.html

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:: Environmentally Friendly Waterproof Coating Developed To Protect Electronics :: A new waterproof coating has been developed by Daikin Industries which is both environmentally friendly and will protect your electronics from water damage.It dries within a minute at room temperature and once dried creates a layer just 0.1 micron to 1 micron thick over the electronics. Daikin Industries explains: “This product isn’t intended for full waterproofing, but for raising the baseline in waterproofing to everyday standards. So we’re suggesting this coating as a way to reduce the risk of phones malfunctioning if they happen to get dropped in water.” For example, even if the phone has an earphone jack or connector, there’s no problem with connection after coating, because this coating is such a thin film. It can be used for protection against water and moisture in applications where, until now, a thicker coating was needed.” The new costing is currently still under development, but is created by dissolving a fluoropolymer in a fluorinated solvent. The fluoropolymer is nonflammable and has low toxicity, making the solution environmentally friendly.

:: Environmentally Friendly Waterproof Coating Developed To Protect Electronics :: A new waterproof coating has been developed by Daikin Industries which is both environmentally friendly and will protect your electronics from water damage.It dries within a minute at room temperature and once dried creates a layer just 0.1 micron to 1 micron thick over the electronics. Daikin Industries explains: “This product isn’t intended for full waterproofing, but for raising the baseline in waterproofing to everyday standards. So we’re suggesting this coating as a way to reduce the risk of phones malfunctioning if they happen to get dropped in water.” For example, even if the phone has an earphone jack or connector, there’s no problem with connection after coating, because this coating is such a thin film. It can be used for protection against water and moisture in applications where, until now, a thicker coating was needed.” The new costing is currently still under development, but is created by dissolving a fluoropolymer in a fluorinated solvent. The fluoropolymer is nonflammable and has low toxicity, making the solution environmentally friendly.

:: Environmentally Friendly Waterproof Coating Developed To Protect Electronics :: A new waterproof coating has been developed by Daikin Industries which is both environmentally friendly and will protect your electronics from water damage.It dries within a minute at room temperature and once dried creates a layer just 0.1 micron to 1 micron thick over the electronics. Daikin Industries explains: “This product isn’t intended for full waterproofing, but for raising the baseline in waterproofing to everyday standards. So we’re suggesting this coating as a way to reduce the risk of phones malfunctioning if they happen to get dropped in water.” For example, even if the phone has an earphone jack or connector, there’s no problem with connection after coating, because this coating is such a thin film. It can be used for protection against water and moisture in applications where, until now, a thicker coating was needed.” The new costing is currently still under development, but is created by dissolving a fluoropolymer in a fluorinated solvent. The fluoropolymer is nonflammable and has low toxicity, making the solution environmentally friendly.

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